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Work in Norway

Norway’s Service Centres for Foreign Workers (SUA)

Norway’s Service Centres for Foreign Workers (SUA) are a vital resource for foreigners who are living and working in Norway. These centers offer a wide range of services, including information and guidance on work and residency permits, language courses, and job search assistance. Here’s a guide to Norway’s Service Centres for Foreign Workers.

What are Service Centres for Foreign Workers?

Service Centres for Foreign Workers are public offices located in various cities throughout Norway. They provide assistance and guidance to foreign workers who are living and working in Norway, including those who are seeking employment, those who are already employed, and those who are in the process of obtaining work and residency permits.

Services Provided

Service Centres for Foreign Workers offer a wide range of services to foreign workers, including:

  1. Work and residency permits: The centers provide information and assistance with obtaining work and residency permits, including guidance on the application process and the necessary documentation.
  2. Language courses: The centers offer language courses to foreign workers, including Norwegian language courses for beginners and advanced learners.
  3. Job search assistance: The centers provide job search assistance, including information on available job opportunities and guidance on job search strategies.
  4. Social services: The centers provide information and assistance with social services, including healthcare, housing, and education.
  5. Legal assistance: The centers offer legal assistance to foreign workers, including guidance on labor laws and employment contracts.
  6. Cultural integration: The centers provide information and assistance with cultural integration, including guidance on customs and traditions in Norway.

Who Can Use Service Centres for Foreign Workers?

Service Centres for Foreign Workers are open to all foreign workers who are living and working in Norway, regardless of their nationality or occupation. The centers are particularly useful for those who are new to Norway and may be unfamiliar with the country’s laws, customs, and language.

How to Use Service Centres for Foreign Workers

To use the services provided by Service Centres for Foreign Workers, simply visit one of the centers located throughout Norway. The centers are typically open during regular business hours, and no appointment is necessary.

When visiting the centers, be sure to bring any necessary documentation, such as your passport and work and residency permits. It is also helpful to have a basic understanding of Norwegian, although many of the staff at the centers speak English and other languages.

Conclusion

Norway’s Service Centres for Foreign Workers are a valuable resource for foreigners who are living and working in Norway. These centers provide a wide range of services, including information and guidance on work and residency permits, language courses, and job search assistance. By using the services provided by these centers, foreign workers can make the most of their time in Norway and ensure a smooth transition to life and work in the country.

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Taxi Driving Jobs in Norway

Taxi driving jobs in Norway offer a great opportunity for individuals who are interested in the transportation industry. Norway is known for its high standard of living and its strong economy, making it a prime destination for taxi drivers. Here is a brief guide to taxi driving jobs in Norway.

Qualifications and Requirements

To work as a taxi driver in Norway, foreign workers must meet certain qualifications and requirements. These include:

  1. Work permit and residency: Foreign workers must have a work permit and residency in Norway in order to work legally. These can be obtained through the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) and the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV).
  2. Language skills: Knowledge of the Norwegian language is essential for taxi drivers in Norway, as they will need to communicate with customers and navigate Norwegian roads and traffic signs.
  3. Valid driver’s license: Taxi drivers in Norway must have a valid Norwegian driver’s license, which can be obtained through the Norwegian Public Roads Administration.
  4. Professional registration: In order to work as a taxi driver in Norway, foreign workers must be registered with the Norwegian Taxi Association.

Finding Taxi Driving Jobs

There are several ways to find taxi driving jobs in Norway, including:

  1. Online job listings: Many taxi companies in Norway post job listings online, including on job search websites such as Nav.no, Indeed.no, and Finn.no.
  2. Recruitment agencies: Recruitment agencies such as JobbNorge and Nordic Jobs Worldwide can help foreign workers find taxi driving jobs in Norway.
  3. Direct application: Some taxi companies in Norway may accept direct applications from foreign workers. It is important to research the company and ensure that you meet all of the qualifications and requirements before applying.

Taxi Driving Salaries and Benefits

Taxi driving salaries in Norway can vary depending on the location and company, but typically range from 200,000-300,000 NOK (approximately $24,000-$36,000 USD) per year. Taxi drivers in Norway receive benefits such as health insurance, paid vacation, and a pension plan.

Working Conditions

Working conditions for taxi drivers in Norway are generally favorable, with flexible hours and the ability to work independently. However, taxi driving can be a physically demanding job, as drivers are required to sit for long periods of time and lift luggage.

Challenges

While taxi driving jobs in Norway offer many benefits, there are also some challenges to consider. These include:

  1. Language barrier: For foreign workers who do not speak Norwegian, the language barrier can be a challenge. It is important to have a basic understanding of Norwegian in order to communicate with customers and navigate Norwegian roads and traffic signs.
  2. Cost of living: Norway is known for its high cost of living, and taxi drivers may need to adjust to a higher cost of living than they are used to.
  3. Cultural differences: Adjusting to a new culture and way of life can be challenging, especially for workers who are relocating from a different country.

Conclusion

Taxi driving jobs in Norway offer a great opportunity for individuals who are interested in the transportation industry. By following the qualifications and requirements, networking, and applying to available job listings, foreign workers can find a fulfilling career as a taxi driver in Norway.

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English Speaking Jobs in Norway

Norway offers a variety of job opportunities for English speakers, especially in industries such as technology, finance, and tourism. With a high standard of living, excellent benefits, and a thriving economy, Norway is an attractive destination for professionals looking to advance their careers. Here is a brief guide to English-speaking jobs in Norway.

Types of English-Speaking Jobs

Norway offers a range of English-speaking jobs, including:

  1. Information technology: Norway’s technology industry is growing rapidly, and there are many opportunities for English-speaking professionals, such as software developers, data analysts, and project managers.
  2. Finance: Norway’s finance industry is also expanding, and there are many job opportunities for English-speaking professionals in fields such as accounting, banking, and financial analysis.
  3. Tourism: Norway’s tourism industry is booming, and there are many jobs available for English-speaking professionals in fields such as hospitality, tour guiding, and event planning.

Qualifications and Requirements

To work in Norway as an English-speaking professional, foreign workers must meet certain qualifications and requirements. These include:

  1. Work permit and residency: Foreign workers must have a work permit and residency in Norway in order to work legally. These can be obtained through the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) and the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV).
  2. Language skills: While English is widely spoken in Norway, knowledge of the Norwegian language can be an advantage in some industries. It is important to have a basic understanding of Norwegian in order to communicate with colleagues and clients.
  3. Qualifications and certifications: Depending on the type of job, workers may need to have specific qualifications and certifications. For example, information technology professionals may need a degree in computer science, while finance professionals may need a certification such as the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) designation.

Finding English-Speaking Jobs

There are several ways to find English-speaking jobs in Norway, including:

  1. Online job listings: Many companies in Norway post job listings online, including on job search websites such as Nav.no, Indeed.no, and Finn.no.
  2. Recruitment agencies: Recruitment agencies such as JobbNorge and Nordic Jobs Worldwide can help foreign workers find English-speaking jobs in Norway.
  3. Networking: Networking can be an important part of finding a job in Norway. Attending industry events and connecting with professionals in your field through social media platforms such as LinkedIn can help you make connections and find job opportunities.
  4. Direct application: Some companies in Norway may accept direct applications from foreign workers. It is important to research the company and ensure that you meet all of the qualifications and requirements before applying.

Salary and Benefits

Salaries for English-speaking professionals in Norway are generally high, with an average salary of around 500,000 NOK (approximately $60,000 USD) per year. Professionals in Norway receive benefits such as health insurance, paid vacation, and a generous pension plan. In addition, companies in Norway offer professional development opportunities and support for continuing education.

Challenges

While English-speaking jobs in Norway offer many benefits, there are also some challenges to consider. These include:

  1. Language barrier: While English is widely spoken in Norway, knowledge of the Norwegian language can be an advantage in some industries. It may be necessary to learn some Norwegian in order to communicate effectively with colleagues and clients.
  2. Cost of living: Norway is known for its high cost of living, and it may take some time to adjust to a higher cost of living than what you are used to.
  3. Cultural differences: Adjusting to a new culture and way of life can be challenging, especially for those who are relocating from a different country.

Conclusion

Norway offers a variety of job opportunities for English speakers, particularly in industries such as technology, finance, and tourism.

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Construction Jobs in Norway

Construction jobs in Norway offer a great opportunity for qualified workers who are looking for employment opportunities abroad. Norway is known for its high standard of living and its strong economy, making it a prime destination for construction workers. Here is a brief guide to construction jobs in Norway.

Types of Construction Jobs

The construction industry in Norway offers a wide range of job opportunities, including:

  1. Construction workers: Construction workers are responsible for performing a variety of tasks, such as digging trenches, pouring concrete, and erecting structures.
  2. Electricians: Electricians install and maintain electrical systems in buildings and structures.
  3. Plumbers: Plumbers install and maintain plumbing systems in buildings and structures.
  4. Carpenters: Carpenters construct and repair building frameworks and structures.

Qualifications and Requirements

To work in the construction industry in Norway, foreign workers must meet certain qualifications and requirements. These include:

  1. Work permit and residency: Foreign workers must have a work permit and residency in Norway in order to work legally. These can be obtained through the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) and the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV).
  2. Language skills: While English is widely spoken in Norway, knowledge of the Norwegian language can be an advantage in the construction industry. It is important to have a basic understanding of Norwegian in order to communicate with colleagues and supervisors.
  3. Qualifications and certifications: Depending on the type of construction job, workers may need to have specific qualifications and certifications. For example, electricians and plumbers must have a valid trade certificate.

Finding Construction Jobs

There are several ways to find construction jobs in Norway, including:

  1. Online job listings: Many construction companies in Norway post job listings online, including on job search websites such as Nav.no, Indeed.no, and Finn.no.
  2. Recruitment agencies: Recruitment agencies such as JobbNorge and Nordic Jobs Worldwide can help foreign workers find construction jobs in Norway.
  3. Networking: Networking can be an important part of finding a construction job in Norway. Attending industry events and connecting with professionals in your field through social media platforms such as LinkedIn can help you make connections and find job opportunities.
  4. Direct application: Some construction companies in Norway may accept direct applications from foreign workers. It is important to research the company and ensure that you meet all of the qualifications and requirements before applying.

Construction Salaries and Benefits

Construction salaries in Norway are among the highest in the world, with an average salary of around 500,000 NOK (approximately $60,000 USD) per year. Construction workers in Norway receive benefits such as health insurance, paid vacation, and a generous pension plan. In addition, construction companies in Norway offer professional development opportunities and support for continuing education.

Conclusion

Construction jobs in Norway offer a great opportunity for qualified workers who are looking for employment opportunities abroad. By following the qualifications and requirements, networking, and applying to available job listings, foreign workers can find a fulfilling career in the Norwegian construction industry.

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Types of Jobs in Norway Work in Norway

Nursing Jobs in Norway

Nursing jobs in Norway offer a unique opportunity for qualified nurses to work in a country that values healthcare and provides a high standard of living. Norway is known for its advanced healthcare system, which provides free healthcare to all residents, and its commitment to education and professional development. Here is a guide to nursing jobs in Norway.

Nurse Job Qualifications and Requirements

To work as a nurse in Norway, foreign nurses must meet certain qualifications and requirements. These include:

  1. Nursing degree: Foreign nurses must have a nursing degree from their home country or a recognized university in Norway. The degree must include a minimum of 3 years of theoretical education and a minimum of 1 year of practical training.
  2. Fluency in Norwegian or English: Foreign nurses must be fluent in Norwegian or English, depending on the language of instruction in the nursing program they completed.
  3. Work permit and residency: Foreign nurses must have a work permit and residency in Norway in order to work legally. These can be obtained through the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) and the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV).
  4. Professional registration: In order to work as a nurse in Norway, foreign nurses must be registered with the Norwegian Registration Authority for Health Personnel (SAFH).

Finding Nursing Jobs

There are several ways to find nursing jobs in Norway, including:

  1. Online job listings: Many hospitals and healthcare facilities in Norway post job listings online, including on job search websites such as Nav.no, Indeed.no, and Finn.no.
  2. Recruitment agencies: Recruitment agencies such as MediCarrera and JobbNorge can help foreign nurses find nursing jobs in Norway.
  3. Networking: Networking can be an important part of finding a nursing job in Norway. Attending industry events and connecting with professionals in your field through social media platforms such as LinkedIn can help you make connections and find job opportunities.
  4. Direct application: Some hospitals and healthcare facilities in Norway may accept direct applications from foreign nurses. It is important to research the facility and ensure that you meet all of the qualifications and requirements before applying.

Nursing Salaries and Benefits

Nursing salaries in Norway are among the highest in the world, with an average salary of around 500,000 NOK (approximately $60,000 USD) per year. Nurses in Norway receive benefits such as health insurance, paid vacation, and a generous pension plan. In addition, hospitals and healthcare facilities in Norway offer professional development opportunities and support for continuing education.

Nurse Job Working Conditions

Working conditions for nurses in Norway are generally favorable, with a strong emphasis on patient care and a focus on a healthy work-life balance. Nurses in Norway typically work 37.5 hours per week, with 25 vacation days per year.

In addition, Norway’s healthcare system is known for its advanced technology and resources, providing nurses with the tools they need to provide the highest level of care to their patients.

Nurse Job Challenges

While nursing jobs in Norway offer many benefits, there are also some challenges to consider. These include:

  1. Language barrier: For foreign nurses who do not speak Norwegian, the language barrier can be a challenge. It is important to have a basic understanding of Norwegian in order to communicate with colleagues and patients.
  2. Cost of living: Norway is known for its high cost of living, and nurses may need to adjust to a higher cost of living than they are used to.
  3. Cultural differences: Adjusting to a new culture and way of life can be challenging, especially for nurses who are relocating from a different country.

Nurse Job Conclusion

Nursing jobs in Norway offer a unique opportunity for qualified nurses to work in a country that values healthcare and provides a high standard of living. By following the qualifications and requirements, networking, and applying to available job listings, foreign nurses can find a fulfilling career.

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Teaching Jobs in Norway

Teaching jobs in Norway can be a great opportunity for foreign educators who are looking to work in a country that values education and offers a high standard of living. However, there are certain qualifications and requirements that foreigners must meet in order to teach in Norway. Here is a guide to teaching jobs in Norway, including the qualifications for foreigners.

Types of Teaching Jobs

There are several types of teaching jobs available in Norway, including:

  1. Primary and secondary schools: Primary and secondary school teachers in Norway are responsible for teaching students from ages 6 to 16. These teachers are required to have a teaching degree and a specific subject area specialization.
  2. International schools: International schools in Norway cater to expat children and provide an English-language curriculum. Teachers at international schools are required to have a teaching degree and experience teaching in an international environment.
  3. Universities and colleges: Professors at universities and colleges in Norway are responsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate students. These positions typically require a PhD and research experience.

Qualifications for Foreigners

Foreigners who wish to teach in Norway must meet certain qualifications and requirements. These include:

  1. A teaching degree: In order to teach in primary and secondary schools in Norway, foreign teachers must have a teaching degree from their home country or a recognized university in Norway. The degree must include a teaching practicum and specific subject area specialization.
  2. Fluency in Norwegian or English: Foreign teachers must be fluent in Norwegian or English, depending on the language of instruction in the school they are applying to. For English-language international schools, teachers must have a native-level proficiency in English.
  3. Work permit and residency: Foreign teachers must have a work permit and residency in Norway in order to work legally. These can be obtained through the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) and the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV).
  4. Teaching experience: While not required, teaching experience in a similar environment can be an advantage for foreign teachers.

Finding Teaching Jobs

There are several ways to find teaching jobs in Norway, including:

  1. Online job listings: Many schools in Norway post job listings online, including on job search websites such as Nav.no, Indeed.no, and Finn.no.
  2. Recruitment agencies: Recruitment agencies such as Teach Norway and JobbNorge can help foreign teachers find teaching jobs in Norway.
  3. Networking: Networking can be an important part of finding a teaching job in Norway. Attending industry events and connecting with professionals in your field through social media platforms such as LinkedIn can help you make connections and find job opportunities.
  4. Direct application: Some schools in Norway may accept direct applications from foreign teachers. It is important to research the school and ensure that you meet all of the qualifications and requirements before applying.

Teaching Salaries and Benefits

Teaching salaries in Norway are among the highest in the world, with an average salary of around 500,000 NOK (approximately $60,000 USD) per year for primary and secondary school teachers. Salaries for professors at universities and colleges are typically higher, depending on experience and research output.

In addition to a high salary, teachers in Norway receive benefits such as health insurance, paid vacation, and a generous pension plan. Schools in Norway also offer professional development opportunities and support for continuing education.

Conclusion

Teaching jobs in Norway can be a great opportunity for foreign educators who meet the qualifications and requirements. With a high standard of living, competitive salaries, and a commitment to education, Norway offers a unique and rewarding environment for teaching. By following the qualifications and requirements, networking, and applying to available job listings, foreign teachers can find a fulfilling career in Norway.

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How to find a job in Norway

If you’re considering moving to Norway for work or are already living and working there, you’re in luck. Norway’s job market is booming, with a thriving economy and low unemployment rates. The country’s focus on innovation and sustainability has created a wealth of opportunities across a range of industries. However, navigating the job market can be challenging, particularly for expats who are unfamiliar with the culture and hiring practices. In this article, we’ll provide you with expert guidance on how to find and land your dream job in Norway.

1. Norway’s Booming Job Market: An Overview of Opportunities

Norway’s economy is built on industries such as oil and gas, fisheries, shipping, and aquaculture. However, there are also opportunities in tech, renewable energy, healthcare, and finance, among others. Many companies in Norway are looking for skilled workers who can contribute to their growth and development. While it may be easier to find work in the larger cities like Oslo, Bergen, and Stavanger, there are also opportunities in smaller towns and rural areas.

2. The Essentials of Job Hunting in Norway: A Guide for Expats

Job hunting in Norway can be quite different from what you’re used to. Here are some essential tips to keep in mind:

  • Research the industry and company you’re interested in.
  • Make sure your skills and experience match the job requirements.
  • Use online job portals like Finn.no, Nav.no, and LinkedIn, as well as recruitment agencies.
  • Customize your resume and cover letter for each application.
  • Prepare for interviews by researching the company, practicing your answers, and dressing professionally.

3. Crafting a Winning Resume: Tips and Tricks for Scandinavian Employers

In Norway, employers expect concise, well-organized resumes that highlight your skills and achievements. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Keep it brief – 1-2 pages is sufficient.
  • Use a professional format and font.
  • Include a personal statement, education, work experience, skills, and interests.
  • Avoid buzzwords and jargon.
  • Include any relevant certifications or language skills.

4. Conquering the Job Interview: Navigating Norwegian Work Culture

Norwegian work culture is characterized by egalitarianism, teamwork, and collaboration. During job interviews, it’s important to demonstrate that you share these values and are a good fit for the company culture. Here are some tips:

  • Be punctual and dress professionally.
  • Research the company and the person you’ll be interviewing with.
  • Show enthusiasm and interest in the company and position.
  • Answer questions concisely and honestly.
  • Show that you’re a team player and can work well with others.

5. The Importance of Networking: Building Professional Relationships in Norway

In Norway, networking is key to finding job opportunities and building professional relationships. Here are some tips:

  • Attend industry events and conferences.
  • Join professional organizations and associations.
  • Use social media platforms like LinkedIn to connect with professionals in your industry.
  • Reach out to alumni from your university or college.
  • Be proactive and ask for referrals or introductions.

6. Work Permits and Visas: Understanding Norway’s Immigration Policies

If you’re a non-EU citizen, you’ll need a work permit and visa to work in Norway. The process can be complex and time-consuming, so it’s important to plan ahead. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Apply for a work permit before you arrive in Norway.
  • You’ll need a job offer or a job seeker visa to apply for a work permit.
  • Your employer will need to sponsor your work permit.
  • You’ll need to provide documents such as a passport, educational certificates, and a criminal record certificate.
  • The process can take several months, so be prepared to wait.

7. Making the Most of Your Norwegian Job: Balancing Work and Life in the Land of Fjords

Norwegians value work-life balance and prioritize family, leisure, and nature. To make the most of your job in Norway, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Take advantage of flexible work arrangements like part-time or remote work.
  • Use your paid vacation time to explore the country’s stunning landscapes and cultural attractions.
  • Join sports clubs or other social groups to meet new people and make connections.
  • Practice ‘koselig‘, the Norwegian concept of coziness, by enjoying good food and drinks and spending time with loved ones.
  • Embrace the ethos of ‘dugnad’, or community work, by volunteering for local projects or events.

Conclusion

Navigating Norway’s job market may seem daunting at first, but with the right guidance and approach, you can find and land your dream job in this prosperous and innovative country. Whether you’re a skilled worker looking to advance your career or an expat seeking new challenges, Norway offers a wealth of opportunities and a high quality of life. By following the tips and tricks outlined in this article, you can navigate the job market with expert ease and build a successful and fulfilling career in the land of fjords.

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How many hours do Norwegians work?

On a national average Norwegians work about 37 hours per week. Although the total hours worked can be less in a corporate office. This is because many Norwegian organizations offer ‘flexible hours’ and there is great autonomy in managing your own hours.

Unlike in many other cultures in Norway, corporate foot soldiers don’t often brag about working more hours than their peers. This can actually be construed as being inefficient or bragging unnecessarily about your contribution at work. Or worse, clashing with Janteloven (the Law of Jante), a social construct where individual success is discouraged and, in many cases, considered inappropriate.


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What jobs are in high demand in Norway?

As a small country with a population of about 5M there are several industries that experience shortages of qualified applications. Currently, the most highly in-demand sectors are oil & gas, hospitality, IT (information technology), nursing, construction, and the fishing industry.

High demand job titles in Norway

  • Nurse
  • Pharmacist
  • HVAC Engineer
  • Railway Engineer
  • Teacher
  • Hotel Receptionist
  • IT Professional
  • Plumber
  • Metalworker
  • Bus Driver
  • Software Engineer
  • Marketing Manager
  • Web Developer

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Meeting Room Culture in Norway


In many other business cultures the meeting room is often more like a battlefield.

It’s where ideas are pushed forward, allies are formed, and confrontation is inevitable.

That’s not how meeting room culture works in Norway.

Meeting Room Culture in Norway - Working with Norwegians

The Norwegian meeting room is a peaceful place, a calm room where grandstanding and chest-pounding is greatly discouraged. 

Even aggressive hand motions are not recommended here!

This was tough for an American. I, am after, all more used to unfurling my feathers, much like a peacock, across the conference room table to make my point. 

However, in Norway, you don’t see much peacocking in the meeting room. The scene is more similar to a flock of extremely polite songbirds chirping in agreement. You can perhaps thank Janteloven (the Law of Jante) for this.

Conversations are structured and well balanced between the participants, with no single participant getting a larger share of the agenda. This happens regardless of seniority in the organization.

In the flat hierarchy of the Norwegian organization, everyone has equal say. A good Norwegian boss will try to guide the conversion and let the participants work it out among themselves so it is common for them to survey the room to ask if anyone has additional thoughts on a subject. Given Norwegians’ shy nature, they almost never do – or at least they feel their potentially disruptive thoughts are not worth sharing.

Meetings in Norway start exactly on time as Norwegians value punctuality. To keep a meeting attendee waiting is considered a great disrespect. Those who deliver work on time and show up for meetings on time earn extra prestige in the workplace. At the same time, arriving early to a meeting is also discouraged as this can create additional stress for the meeting host entertaining you until the meeting starts or other participants are ready.

Meeting Room Culture Norway

In Norway meetings also end exactly on time and typically not a second later. This hard stop gives Norwegians a much needed exit from the room, which of course helps them avoid one of their greatest fears: having to make small talk. When the meeting ends everyone quickly shuffles out of the room. You don’t linger, there is no smooth transition from meeting discussions to small talk. You sort of just look at your shoes and slink towards the exit.

In general it’s not appropriate to talk about one’s private life during meetings in Norway. This should be avoided. From personal experience, I can recommend not over-sharing about your complicated love life, that time you drank excessively and did something ridiculous, or your views on religion and politics in general. Any of those are likely to create discomfort with the meeting participants. Meetings are strictly business affairs.

It’s important you understand Norwegian meeting room culture as you do business here. That’s because in Norway you’re going to have a lot of meetings.

Sometimes you have a meeting to plan the next meeting. 


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